Bitcoinx stefan thomas Archives - Bitcoinx

Where was Graig Wright when Satoshi was posting on the bitcoin forum? If he was residing in Australia he would be making mostly dead of night posts.

from wikipedia Satoshi:
Stefan Thomas, a Swiss coder and active community member, graphed the time stamps for each of Nakamoto's bitcoin forum posts (more than 500); the resulting chart showed a steep decline to almost no posts between the hours of 5 a.m. and 11 a.m. Greenwich Mean Time. Because this pattern held true even on Saturdays and Sundays, it suggested that Nakamoto was asleep at this time.[11] If Nakamoto is a single individual with conventional sleeping habits, it suggests he resided in a region using the UTC−05:00 or UTC−06:00 time offset. This includes the parts of North America that fall within the Eastern Time Zone and Central Time Zone, as well as parts of Central America, the Caribbean and South America.
submitted by mpow to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Here is a transcript from the Ripple Consensus Presentation (May 22nd)

https://www.xrpchat.com/topic/5203-ripples-big-demo-and-why-you-missed-the-big-deal/?do=findComment&comment=49659
MY TRANSCRIPTION... 0:19
PATRICK GRIFFIN: All right I think we're gonna get started. There's total capacity. People at the door - there's a little room over here inside. There's chairs here - there’s chairs over here don't be shy. All right in case you don't know this, you are in “XRP In Action,” a live demo and expert Q & A.
I’m Patrick Griffin [with] David Schwartz and Stefan Thomas. We've got an hour today. We'll walk you through, we’ll do a quick round of introductions. Stefan is going to do a demo. We have a self-guided Q&A where I basically tee up some questions for these guys that will all be softballs don't worry! Then we'll turn it over to you guys to ask questions for the technical experts. Maybe we'll do it the quick round of intros, starting with Stefan:
1:07 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah so, my name is Stefan Thomas I am CTO with Ripple. Before Ripple I was involved with BitCoin for several years and now I work on the vision and technical direction for Ripple.
1:22 DAVID SCHWARTZ: My name is David Schwartz. I'm the chief cryptographer at Ripple. I’ve been working on Ripple since 2011 and public ledger tech. Before that I was working on cryptographic messaging systems and cloud storage for government and military applications.
1:35 PATRICK GRIFFIN: I am Patrick Griffin. I’m the head of business development. I don’t know why I’m up here, but there’s our CTO and our head of cryptography, but actually I think we are the, to be honest here, I think we are the, we are the one two and three first employees of Ripple. Well, two one and three. We've been here for quite some time and it's been a long journey. So why don't we first start off with the demo and I think I'll tee it up: This is a demo that demonstrates our technical our technology start of the inter ledger protocol, moving payments in and out of XRP and Stefan will do a better job of articulating what you are about to see.
2:22 STEFAN THOMAS: All right thanks Patrick. So here we're gathered to have a quick round table on XRP. I want to go through the demo pretty quickly so we can get to the actual discussion Q&A which I thin is the meat of this session. Basically, what we're trying to do at Ripple is we're trying to make money move like information. This has been our mission since day one, and it has never changed and so we're building a number of different technologies that all integrate to make this vision a reality. And so what we think about how information actually moves I think it's really it's really this chart that captures it.
So what's happened is that the cost of moving information has really declined over the last couple decades and very strongly so. And as a result the volume of information that’s been moving has exploded. And so, very often you know, our customers will be talking to me about, you know:
Oh are you focused on corporate payments? Are you focused on consumer payments?
I think what you have to realize is that we're somewhere down here in that curve and so you know when you say like two-thirds of all payments are corporate payments you're really talking about two-thirds of almost nothing. I think what we're focused on is this growth that you can create if you increase the efficiency of the system enough.
And so the way that we're kind of approaching that is we want to streamline the way that liquidity works today. So today you have 27 trillion dollars in float sitting around the world that is essentially there to facilitate real-time payments when the underlying systems are not real time.
3:59 STEFAN THOMAS: So, for instance, I swipe my credit card somewhere there has to be an actual creditor or money available to pay that merchant if that's supposed to happen instantly if the underlying money can't move in real time. And so that's been the case ever since we were using gold and fiat currencies in order to move money internationally, but with digital assets there's actually opportunity to improve upon that and actually move real assets in real time.
So if you have something like XRP you don't need to pre-fund float all around the world. You can actually just have this digital asset and if you want to transfer value to somebody, you want to transfer value internationally, you can just transfer that asset and that moves instantly okay?
4:40 STEFAN THOMAS: So that's really the improvement. So with that I want to give you sort of a case example in a demo. This is something that already happens on blockchains today where there are money sources business that are using, businesses they're using block chain in order to move funds so they might sort of offer this as a service to small and medium businesses where if I want to let's say pay somebody in a different country I can go to one of these companies and they will move that money for me.
5:09 STEFAN THOMAS: So, in this example, we're kind of pretending that we're a publisher, we have a reporter in the field. and we’d like to pay them. And so, you know we don't really build apps, but we enable banks and other money service businesses to build apps on top of our platform. So this is kind of a mock-up that we’ve developed where, you can imagine, this would be just built into the the particular app of that company. And so I can basically pick any amount, so let’s say I want to send, say $7, and what happens is that you can see is that amount updates so what happens during that time is that we actually try to find the cheapest path from where the sender is to which are provided at the recipient uses and then once we found that cheapest path, we figure out what the exact cost is going to be, so we have that transparency upfront. What is the cost of this payment and this is all powered by the open source protocol InterLedger. Now, when I send this payment, it goes through right away. I don't have to wait for a ton of confirmations and so on.
6:11 STEFAN THOMAS: So let's talk a little bit about what is happening there in the background. So first, we basically look at the topology of the network and then we try to find a path. So say it found a path through XRP. Once we select the path, we basically send a code request to figure out what we think that cost is going to be and then we send the money through in two phases as per InterLedger Protocol, and that's enabled on XRP using a feature called escrow that we just launched earlier this year and so now XRP is it's fully InterLedger enabled.
6:50 STEFAN THOMAS: So, if we look at the kind of a cost calculation, this is kind of some fictional numbers but it's correct in terms of order of magnitude, right. So you have Bitcoin, you have Theory, we have XRP, we have Swift, and so our algorithm basically goes in and it tries to select the best option and so people often ask me like why does InterLedger help XRP? or why are you guys working on InterLedger as a completely neutral protocol when you actually have this vested interest in XRP?
7:18 STEFAN THOMAS: Well, because the reason is that XRP is right now by far the best digital asset but it's not being used as much as Bitcoin, for instance, and so in order to close that gap we want to get to a point where the selection of asset is kind of automated and you have algorithms to just pick the best one in which case, right now, XRP would get picked all the time. So that's why we have such a vested interest in just enabling more efficient selection. All right. So as you can see, it's the lowest fee right now and it’s the fastest turn right.
7:48 STEFAN THOMAS: Now, going a little bit further into the future, I was kind of talking about that huge explosion in volume and I think where that comes from is completely new user inter faces that we don't necessarily think about today. So one example would be, you have something like a publisher and a reader and a reporter and the reader is actually browsing an article and they're not having to sign up and go through a paywall in order to do that Their browser just pays them on their behalf automatically and then as a publisher I can see the money sort of coming in, in real time as users are browsing my website. And so you're basically providing the sort of metered access to your content. There's just one example. I think there's a lot of cases of APIs and other parts the industry that could benefit from micro-payments as a more granular way of transacting. So I don't have time to talk about that, but with that I hope you've got sort of a taste of both what XRP looks like today as well as what the future holds in terms of doing micro payments through payment channels, and so on, on InterLedger. So with that, I'll hand it over to Patrick to start the discussion.
9:00 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Very cool. So maybe it’s worth stepping back and also looking at our company strategy and having a conversation around what it means when we talk about an Internet of Value, which I think well this is a Silicon Valley company and for most people that doesn't mean a whole lot so maybe we can take a first stab at trying to explain what is an Internet of Value and Stefan, I’ll start with you. Actually, why don’t we start with David and give you a break.
9:24 DAVID SCHWARTZ: Yeah, so what is the Internet of Value and what are we working on? Well, the Internet has brought connectivity to billions of people around the world. They have smart phones. They have easy access to the movement of information but money is still siloed. It's still trapped in systems that don't talk to each other. Moving payments are expensive. They're slow. There's high friction. There's trillions of dollars that moves across borders and that's moved mostly by financial institutions, and we need to move that money more efficiently. We need to know where it is. We need to improve that flow.
10:02 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I don't know if any of you have made international payments or most of you have on traditional systems and you know that it's very hard to know where that money is. It’s very hard to know how much it's going to cost you ahead of time. The user experience is not great. A significant fraction of those payments fail. It takes several days. It's almost easier to ship money than it is to use our existing payment system. So we want to provide an Internet of Value where there is instant payment. Payment on demand, without failure. When you know ahead of time how much money is going to deliver. You know what path is going to take and because that transaction is set up using modern internet protocols you know ahead of time exactly what the requirements are at the destination so you don't have a failure because you didn't have the right information at the beginning.
10:45 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah so um whenever I think of the Internet of Value, I think the number one thing that happened with the internet was that it kind of commoditized reach. So, before the Internet, if you wanted to be an online service provider like AOL or CompuServe the number one thing that you needed to have in order to be competitive is a lot of users. And if the main thing you're competing over is just having a lot of users it's very hard to get into that market for obvious reasons because you start out with zero users so how do you attract the first couple? But once you have something like the internet where all the different networks are actually tied together, suddenly the number of users you have is completely irrelevant, right? Because all of the networks are tied together you can reach all the websites, you can email all the people on the internet and so the competition has to be about something else and what does it become about? It becomes about about the efficiency of the system.
11:35: STEFAN THOMAS: And so, this fundamental transition has not happened with money yet. Like right now the the biggest consumer payment systems are things like Visa and MasterCard and they're very much competing on: We’re the biggest. We have the most merchants. We have the most customers, and so how are you going to compete with us, right? We would not even have to try to be efficient, necessarily, right? Because we're only competing with each other. It's very hard to get into that market, and so what we're trying to do with InterLedger, by creating an internet working protocol we're allowing you to go across multiple hops across multiple steps through the financial system and as a result you can tie a lot of smaller providers, a lot of smaller banks together and as a result make a system that’s much more competitive.
12:15: PATRICK GRIFFIN: I’ll just add my two cents in. I when I talk about the Internet of Value with customers it's typically the conversation on the cost and opportunities and for us you know, one of the analogies it's overused in the internet I think the Internet of Value, at least for me, is the function of bringing the marginal cost of payment processing down to as close to zero as possible. Now you can do that in one of two ways: Lower the cost of payment processing. Just for the sake of conversation these two things are 50/50. Payment processing: the messaging going between institutions and the cost of reconciling transactions as they go from one siloed network to another siloed network. Those are huge costs that the system currently bears just as a function of tracking down lost payments or fixing mistakes and broken transactions.
13:00 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Something like 12% of all international wires fail. That is an astonishing number if you come from Silicon Valley where you're typically used to five nines of reliability. The financial system isn’t working even with one nine of reliability. The other side of the equation so that it’s a processing function. We are able to achieve better processing by starting that sort of settlement layer, it’s a little bit academic, but then ultimately what our customers are buying from us today is just a payment processing capability.
13:30 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The second stool, leg of the stool, if you will, this two-legged stool, for this Internet of Value, is liquidity. And this iquidity cost is a huge component of the payments that infrastructure today. And so, when you think about the cost that you pay when you wire money internationally, it's not just processing costs and fees. Banks and financial institutions and payment processors have to cover their cost of capital. They are laying out a massive amount of cash in different overseas accounts to make sure that when you send a payment to Japan there's cash on hand in Japan to service your payment.
14:05 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The whole visual that we saw here with XRP that's really where we see there being a large opportunity to bring the liquidity costs down if you can fund your payment instantly on demand without pre-floating cash or opening up credit lines with your counter-parties you can really bring down this component of that cost so those two things together in my mind at least that's that is what really comprises the internet of value. You tackle those two things: processing and liquidity really starts to open up and level the playing field. And on leveling the playing field maybe a question back to you Stefan is and a little bit about the strategy so as we go out and roll out these new APIs for bank to bank or financial institution processing, this narrative around using the digital assets upon payment certainly there's no reason why you couldn't insert Bitcoin in there or Etherium or some other digital assets do you view this as maybe leveling the playing field for all digital assets and creating an opportunity for other digital assets to come in and basically compete for that case?
STEFAN THOMAS: 15:12 Yeah so, we definitely look at it as as a way to create more competition I think that I'm just looking at the market today, most of the digital assets out there are not really designed for enterprising spaces, right? There they're coming from a background of direct to consumer use. They're kind of designed in a way that maybe isn't always necessarily totally in line with how regulators think about the financial system and as a result it’s quite difficult for companies to use these assets, so I think maybe some of people in the room are Bitcoin entrepreneurs and so you may know some of these struggles and you know some of these difficulties of using an asset like Bitcoin. I think you know me, speaking as CTO, more from the technical side, there are definitely big differences between the different digital assets, and so if you look at things like settlement speed on Ripple you get below four seconds most of the time four seconds on average. On Bitcoin you have to wait nine minutes between just to get one confirmation.
16:14 STEFAN THOMAS: There's things like finality. On Ripple when you get one confirmation you can hundred percent trust it, it cannot get reversed because the set of validators that are known so it can't be some validator you've never heard of suddenly coming up with a different answer. Whereas on Bitcoin, there can always be a longer chain that you just haven't heard of yet so you have to wait for multiple confirmations to gain more confidence. Another difference is that you know Ripple is non-deterministic and so bitcoin is is random so what that means is that the actual delay between blocks on Ripple is pretty consistent. It's four seconds with the standard deviation of 0.8 seconds so it's almost always exactly four seconds. And so, with Bitcoin it's more variable, right? So you could have a block after a minute. You can have a block after half an hour. And so, it's much harder for businesses to kind of rely on a system that has that high variability because it increases your risk as you holding an asset.
17:12 STEFAN THOMAS: So these are just some examples of why we think that XRP is best suited for payments use cases. And I think I'll give, be giving a talk later today on on going into a bit more depth on some of these differences
17:28 DAVID SCHWARTZ: And and we're not afraid of a level playing field. As Stefan said we think we can succeed on a level playing field but also you can get people to build a level playing field. It's very hard to get other people to stand behind something that has a built-in bias in favor of one company. Twitter doesn’t, it doesn't mind the fact that the internet wasn't built for Twitter. Facebook doesn't mind. They like the fact that there's an open platform that everybody can support and use and they're willing to compete on that level playing field and if they lose on that level playing field you know, so be it, somebody else will win and the world will be a better place for it. We believe that we have the advantages today and we believe that we can get the industry behind an open standard that facilitates these types of instantaneous payments.
18:07 PATRICK GRIFFIN: So David, this is a question coming back to you. In this level playing field obviously there are digital assets can compete on different characteristics. Obviously I think that Bitcoin as scalability challenges have been I think very famous recently could you comment a little bit on Bitcoin’s recent lows some of the things that have come up around resiliency scalability and maybe draw a contrast to XRP and how XRP is working.
18:32 DAVID SCHWARTZ: Sure. I think the idea that you don't need governance. The idea that you can just have this decentralized system that magically government itself doesn't really work. The internet is a decentralized system it has governance. Bitcoin currently is experiencing a little bit of a governance failure due to with dis-alignment of incentives. Historically the minerss have had an incentive to keep the system working. Everybody needs the Bitcoin system to work, whether you hold, whether you try to do payment’s, whether you're mining. This system has to work or nobody has anything. Everybody's benefited from the value of Bitcoin going up. If you’re a miner, you want the value to go up. If you hold Bitcoin, you want the value to go up. If you're using it for payments having more liquidity and lower risk and holding bitcoins is good for you.
19:11 DAVID SCHWARTZ: So everybody's incentives were aligned. They're starting to become dis-aligned recently because miners have been getting a lot of revenue from transaction fees Miners like high transaction fees. Users obviously would prefer to pay less for their payments. People who want to use Bitcoin as a payment platform want frictionless payments and they're not getting them because of the fees. So there's been a little bit of a governance breakdown due to that misalignment of incentives and it's not clear how you resolve that. It's not really clear how the stakeholders can realign their incentives.
19:39 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I’m confident that Bitcoin will come out come through it but I think it shows that governance is important. You should understand how a system is governed whatever system it is because there is going to have to be governance. It’s not going to magically govern itself. Now Ripple, the stakeholders are the validators and the validators are sort of chosen by the other validators, so right now Ripple is obviously very big in that space. We’re the major stakeholder on the network, but the recent interest into the price increase has begun diversifying the stakeholders and so we hope to see different jurisdictions, different companies and those will be the people who will be the stakeholders and they'll make the decision if there are going to be changes in the rules behind in that market. We think that that will work better and I think if you, once you accept that there has to be governance, you really want it to be the people who are using the network. You don't want the technology to force you into having other stakeholders whose interest may be adverse to the people who just want to use the system to store value and make payments.
20:32 PATRICK GRIFFIN: So what stuff, I mean do you have anything to add just in terms of the underlying design of the systems and how they're confirming transactions? I think when you go way way way back to our company's beginning it was billed as Bitcoin 2.0. And you know we felt like there was another way you could build a decentralized digital asset without without mining. So maybe talk a little about the confirmation engine behind XRP and some of its advantages over other systems
21:04 STEFAN THOMAS: Yeah, so as I mentioned in the introduction, I was fairly involved in the in the Bitcoin community back in 2010-2011 and one of the features that I contributed to was paid to script hash as a reviewer it was one of the first people to re-implement Bitcoin and I pointed out some flaws and you know we ended up with a much better solution. And so, through that experience going through the cycle of new feature on Bitcoin, even back then when the committee was much smaller I realized that it was actually very painful to do even a uncontroversial improvement to the system and that was partly because people had a very strong tendency to be conservative which is a good thing, for any, like whenever you're modifying a live system. But there was also just like no good process for introducing changes.
22:00 STEFAN THOMAS: We had to come up with a process ad hoc. We came up with this whole voting on mining power and so on. Now, from that experience I remember going back to a wiki page on the big part of working called the hard fork wish list and I kind of looked at and is sort of the list of things other things that we wanted to do and a lot of them were in my opinion, in my humble opinion, must haves for any kind of mainstream or enterprise adoption and so I was kind of like putting numbers next to them like this would take eight months this would take 12 months this would take two years and it started to add up like I'm not going to see this get to that point if we go at this rate.
22:38 STEFAN THOMAS: And then you know Ripple approached me and they had a lot of that hard fork wish list already implemented but maybe more importantly they had a different idea on the governance structure and I think there's sort of two key differences: The first key difference is there is an entity that's actually funding the development of the asset and all the technology behind the asset. And so you know, I was looking at the Bitcoin foundation website the other day and they're currently, their most recent blog post is to promote this lawsuit in New York to try to strike down the bit license and apparently the foundation feels that it's strategically important for Bitcoin to kind of fund this lawsuit and they looked at how many people had actually donated to the donation address that they were giving and it was just over a thousand dollars basically. Almost nothing
23:31 STEFAN THOMAS: And I was thinking like well if XRP you know had any strategic issue like that there would be millions of dollars immediately that just Ripple would put behind the issue and so as a holder of the asset that's really important for me to know that, you know, there is some some entity that's actually defending it from a technical standpoint, from a legal standpoint, from a business standpoint. That makes a big difference
23:53 STEFAN THOMAS: And then the second big difference that I saw was how features and how generally the evolution of the technology is managed. So on Ripple, there's voting among the validators, which is not too dissimilar from you know the kind of mining voting that we're doing on Bitcoin. However the validators on Ripple are largely chosen by the users or they are chosen by the users. And so they're not chosen by so this algorithm or just by their virtue of being very efficient in mining. And so as David pointed out earlier, the incentives are very different. On Ripple, the incentives are you know I want the people who are appointing me to be validators to be happy with my validations because otherwise you know there's what they will stop paying me. And so you know there's a much more closely aligned incentive for the value of some Ripple to do what the actual users want to do.
24:46 DAVID SCHWARTZ: And I would add that there there are sort of vulnerabilities in both types of systems. Like with the miners, it would be a double spend. With the validators, they could simply stop validating and the network would halt, but one tremendous difference is that you know how to fix one and it's not clear how you would fix the other so if you had the miners that were being pressured, let's say by a friend in government, or they were double spending or for whatever reason they are holding transaction fees high, let's say the block size issue got to the point where it was absolutely critical and there was no ability to come up with an agreement. It's not clear how you solve that. You change the mining algorithm? Like that's the nuclear option? Nobody knows what you do. With the system on consensus it is clear what you do. You can, you can change the validators. The validators work at the pleasure of the users, the holders, the real stakeholders of the network.
25:33 DAVID SCHWARTZ: That, I think that is a fairly significant advantage once you realize how important governance is. And it's not just a handle of failure as Stefan pointed out there's going to be evolution of the system unless you think the systems are absolutely perfect today. Well bitcoin is already proven that there they're not absolutely perfect today. I can’t, I certainly wouldn't try to claim the Ripple is perfect today. We have a wish list of features too, limited by engineering time, but we have to get people to agree to implement those features and I think that's also an argument why you can't have one blockchain to rule them all. There are features that also have costs and every feature has a cost because if you have a public blockchain everybody that uses that public blockchain, at a minimum, when there's a new feature they have to do a security review and make sure that that feature doesn't create a vulnerability for them. So there's a fixed cost that's fairly high. There's a huge bug bounty on Bitcoin and on Ripple right? Billions of dollars if you could steal money on the system. So the cost to implement a feature is high. So if there's a feature that somebody really wants it would be really useful for them they're probably not going to get that's not enough to get any feature on the system, so you're going to have a diversified system of multiple block chains and multiple ledger systems of all kinds competing with each other for share. that's why I think InterLedger is important because InterLedger will permit people who use different block chains and different systems, for good reasons, to be able to make payments to each other quickly seamlessly and without the risk associated with little pays problem.
26:53 PATRICK GRIFFIN: hmm Maybe just a last question before we turn it over to the audience and you've mentioned InterLedger. Stefan is the creator of InterLedger or the chief architect of it. When you walk around the conference today, you'll see a lot of companies that have blockchain offering. So, sort of going back to 2014, now if you remember, the the terminology and the marketing was all about it's not about Bitcoin it's about the blockchain. And so now we have some sound perspective on that. What's your take on the fundamental premise of a de-centralized distributed database without a digital asset and what's the trade-offs in terms of functionality versus utility? What's your opinion given the architecture IOP.
27:42 STEFAN THOMAS: Well that's a question I could easily spend hours on, so let me try to summarize. So as you mentioned, my colleague Evan Schwartz and I, we we came up with this protocol InterLedger and that came out of actually in a couple of different work streams but one in particular I remember was I was trying to figure out how to make Ripple more scalable and I was thinking about a particular kind of scalability which is similar to what David just mentioned, which was scalability in terms of functionality not just in terms of how many transactions can you do per second. Like how do I serve very different use cases that have you know mutually conflicting trade-offs. So as I was thinking about that problem I was kind of saying well maybe you don't even have to keep that one set of global state. Maybe you can have state in different places and a lot of that is honestly just rediscovering database knowledge that we've had since the 70s. Now just looking at Jim Gray's papers and just oh yeah that works for blockchains too
28:41 STEFAN THOMAS: So we took those ideas and we combined them with ideas around from the internet from the internet background in terms of networking and the concept of internet working and so on. And so, when I look at these private blockchains type approaches I think they are doing the first of those two steps namely they're applying sort of modern data, modern database thinking or classical database thinking to blockchain but I don't think they're really applying the Internet thinking yet because they're if they're attempting to achieve interoperability just by homogeneity which does not give you that diversity of use cases and so if you want that you have to think about what are the simple stateless protocols they can actually tie these different systems together without dictating how they work internally. So I can have my private blockchains that has all these like special features and it works in this way and you can have your private box and it works in the other way but we can still talk through a neutral protocol and you know the way that we're thinking about InterLedger, we're not married to InterLedger being a thing like I'm completely happy if it's lightning or if it's something else but I think as an industry to agree on some kind of standard on that layer.
29:51 STEFAN THOMAS: I think one of the reasons that we can is because unlike a blockchain a standard is neutral you know there's no acid anyone's getting rich off of. There's no there's a lot less to agree on. The list of decisions you have to make is a lot shorter. You know my colleague Evan, he makes a point, a very good point about with InterLedger only like seven eight major decisions that you have to make in the architecture to really arrive at it and so I think we have really good reasons for each one of them and so we think that there will be a certain convergence on on one standard protocol for again not just blockchains, but like any kind of ledger.
30:26 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I just ant to add that InterLedger is completely neutral to how the ledger works internally. Any ledger that can support a very short list of very simple operations. Every banking ledger can perform those operations. Almost anything the tracks ownership of value of any kind is capable of confirming that value exists, putting that value on hold, transferring that value between two people and those are the only primitives that InterLedger builds on. It's just by the clever combination of those operations in a way that provides insurance that all of the stakeholders get out of the transaction the thing that they're supposed to get out and get back whatever they were going to put in if they don't get out what they're supposed to get out. It’s, it's astonishingly simple at the protocol level.
31:08 PATRICK GRIFFIN: Okay, with that I will turn it over to the room for questions and some Q&A Aany questions in the back?
QUESTION: Yeah, I’m kind of new to this and I just have some really basic questions. I read something recently where, Ripple was now the second most funded, or invested. Bitcoin was first, and Etherium was third. Can you tell me how you got to that position? You seem like you’re poking up about Bitcoin and how Ripple probably is more efficient and better. Then I had a second question - Where do I get a Ripple T-Shirt?
32:06 PATRICK GRIFFIN: The first question is how did, how did we get to this position we're in and does that generally capture the essence of that question and then Ripple t-shirts I'm not sure about that (Come work for us!) I will attempt to answer the first question and if you guys want to jump in. I think that is a function of one: Silicon Valley companies do one thing I think very well, they pick a lane and they go deep on it. For us, what we've been very very focused on it the use case. as a company we but we picked a long time ago to go deep on cross-border payments and in particular wholesale cross-border payments that’s financial institution to institution. It’s at the enterprise level and so when we look at digital assets today we think that there is a very very very use case around the consolidation of capital to fund payments overseas, which is exactly what we just demonstrated. Being able to transfer an asset from a server in one country to a server in another country and basically allow for payments companies to operate with much less capital deployed overseas. It's a, it's a quantifiable use case. Today there's 27 and a half trillion dollars in float in the banking system just wait sitting idly waiting for payments to arrive. That's compounded when you go to look at corporates and you look at payment service companies. So there's a very very very very very big number and I think that the recent traction that we've gotten has been an acknowledgement of the use case how it fits into our overall product offering. Ssome of the technical benefits of XRP itself and then when you look around, I mean I think that its head, you're hard-pressed to find another digital asset with as clearly articulated the use case that where the time horizon is now. I think there's lots of really exciting things going on in IOT and device-to-device payments and sort of the future some of things that I that Etherium people talk about for example, but it still feels like it's still at the horizon and I think this is being deployed today. There is a a path to commercial production and ultimately I think that's part of the reason why we're getting some traction.
34:18 DAVID SCHWARTZ: I think we also sort of crossed an important threshold. If an asset doesn't have value and it doesn't have liquidity you can't really use it even if it has the properties that are perfect for your use case simply because you can't you can't get enough of it without moving the market and I think we crossed a threshold (not the end) -
*use the link above to view the entire transcript.**
submitted by ripcurldog to Ripple [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Anarcho_Capitalism top posts from 2011-09-23 to 2017-09-22 12:08 PDT

Period: 2191.38 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 81641
Rate (per day) 0.46 37.23
Unique Redditors 501 8290
Combined Score 247608 469801

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 9023 points, 34 submissions: TheGreatRoh
    1. Stefan Molyneux on Twitter | "Bernie promised cheap education. $27 average donation. Mission accomplished. $27 got you truly schooled on the reality of Dem politics." (746 points, 158 comments)
    2. Brain damage explains a lot (491 points, 72 comments)
    3. Ron Paul standing up for what's right. (418 points, 47 comments)
    4. This Tweet Didn't Age Well (409 points, 47 comments)
    5. Hillary Clinton on Assange "Can't we just drone this guy" -- report (345 points, 85 comments)
    6. BREAKING: Trump to sign exec. order this morning requiring that for every 1 new regulation, 2 regulations have to be revoked - sr. official (337 points, 122 comments)
    7. Ouch (337 points, 42 comments)
    8. So Swings the Pendulum of History (312 points, 31 comments)
    9. Resist! The more you think about it the best this one gets (302 points, 50 comments)
    10. Here is Rand Paul's healthcare plan. It's 4 pages long. It simplifies the entire process, removes federal bureaucracy, and lowers costs. EVERYONE SHOULD READ IT! (284 points, 75 comments)
  2. 8356 points, 24 submissions: TrueBC
    1. Small Government (715 points, 97 comments)
    2. Good Guy Communism (698 points, 14 comments)
    3. Real Thinking (616 points, 60 comments)
    4. When You're an Anarcho Communist And You Receive Inheritance (544 points, 128 comments)
    5. Every. God. Damn. Time! (487 points, 71 comments)
    6. Good Cops (468 points, 79 comments)
    7. Typical Proletariat (407 points, 100 comments)
    8. AnCap Problems (368 points, 60 comments)
    9. Fucking Statist Parents (336 points, 27 comments)
    10. Roads Problem Solved (331 points, 59 comments)
  3. 4593 points, 16 submissions: Pinochet-Heli-Tours
    1. This guy (715 points, 97 comments)
    2. Leftist logic with estate taxes (487 points, 123 comments)
    3. Before there was capitalism food would just magically appear (376 points, 155 comments)
    4. Socialism 101 (342 points, 168 comments)
    5. I hate it when people cheat (326 points, 61 comments)
    6. Communist vs Nature (295 points, 101 comments)
    7. This guy... (253 points, 50 comments)
    8. Triggered! (251 points, 116 comments)
    9. Good riddance (243 points, 100 comments)
    10. If there's less food in socialism, how does that explain the toilet paper shortages? (223 points, 28 comments)
  4. 3993 points, 1 submission: an1h
    1. TSA agents vs terrorists (3993 points, 173 comments)
  5. 3413 points, 13 submissions: kurokamifr
    1. When you are american (568 points, 94 comments)
    2. socialism (392 points, 110 comments)
    3. When you love the poor (336 points, 81 comments)
    4. Brain expanding meme on communist (295 points, 39 comments)
    5. A group of ancaps were able to get the IRS Facebook page removed... (263 points, 22 comments)
    6. Rigging the Election - Video I: Clinton Campaign and DNC Incite Violence at Trump Rallies (260 points, 73 comments)
    7. Rigging the Election - Video II: Mass Voter Fraud (222 points, 78 comments)
    8. who is prepared for the WW3? (215 points, 52 comments)
    9. rly make you think (185 points, 134 comments)
    10. Warning: Trudeau has allowed banks to seize your money if economy fails (181 points, 67 comments)
  6. 3173 points, 6 submissions: -INFOWARS-
    1. Louds and clear (1119 points, 180 comments)
    2. Makes you think... (742 points, 161 comments)
    3. Ron Paul destroys Obama (499 points, 78 comments)
    4. This is 100% real. Brainwashing by the Mainstream Media (341 points, 109 comments)
    5. Powerful argument. (300 points, 185 comments)
    6. When your ideology is so good the only arguments against it are straw man memes (172 points, 134 comments)
  7. 3036 points, 13 submissions: bearjewpacabra
    1. Nigel Farage: "None of you have ever done a proper job in your lives, or worked in business or worked in trade or indeed ever created a job" (354 points, 160 comments)
    2. Why is "income tax" a thing that exists?? It's income. They feed their kids with that. Just leave their income alone. (323 points, 147 comments)
    3. Statists reacting to "Taxation is theft" (297 points, 46 comments)
    4. Without the state, who would drop tear gas from helicopters on their half starved tax cattle? (261 points, 54 comments)
    5. Cops demand Uber driver turn off his camera, citing new law, threaten him with jail, say they will search his car with sniffer dogs. Driver refuses, because it turns out the driver is also an attorney and he knows no such law exists. • news (253 points, 62 comments)
    6. Remember when watching tonight's debate... (247 points, 89 comments)
    7. Was very happy to see this on /all (234 points, 40 comments)
    8. Virginia Shooter Identified As 66-Year-Old James Hodgkinson, Supporter Of Bernie Sanders (219 points, 129 comments)
    9. George Soros Hacked, Over 2,500 Internal Docs Released Online (198 points, 34 comments)
    10. Without government, who would create nationwide initiatives to fuck up the food supply based on irrational, government produced data? (173 points, 33 comments)
  8. 2924 points, 9 submissions: Z3F
    1. How to trigger /Socialism (772 points, 200 comments)
    2. The John Oliver formula (443 points, 84 comments)
    3. Trump Triggers a room full of Socialism sympathizers (351 points, 154 comments)
    4. Peak Reddit (317 points, 118 comments)
    5. And quality of life in the Commune dramatically improved overnight. (263 points, 68 comments)
    6. Found at a hostel I am staying at in Detroit. It's leaking into real life. (219 points, 155 comments)
    7. Obama Quietly Signs The Truly Orwellian "Countering Disinformation And Propaganda Act" Into Law (201 points, 27 comments)
    8. The easiest question you'll be asked today. (187 points, 64 comments)
    9. The window of allowable opinion continues to shrink. YouTube is now quarantining videos that academically discuss differences in IQ averages between ethnicities. (171 points, 97 comments)
  9. 2906 points, 1 submission: FreeqAxel
    1. Ron Paul got an electoral vote from Texas. (2906 points, 128 comments)
  10. 2565 points, 14 submissions: Anenome5
    1. Detroit starting to get it: 'Why should I send them taxes when they aren't supplying services?’ homeowner Fred Phillips who owes more than $2,600 recently told the paper. 'Every time I see the tax bill come, I think about the times we called and nobody came.' (247 points, 130 comments)
    2. Kaspersky reveals software buried in the firmware of world's major harddrive manufacturers gives NSA ability to spy on majority of the world's computers (229 points, 72 comments)
    3. The parable of the Village and the Tower (202 points, 44 comments)
    4. Descent of the Libertarians (200 points, 163 comments)
    5. Mises attacks Racism; "racism is not just contrary to [classical] liberalism, but to reason itself. It’s a denial of the most fundamental truths of economics... Theories of racial conflict reject peaceful social cooperation and instead promote conflict and war as the foundations of human society." (185 points, 161 comments)
    6. Cops arrest jogger for not having ID (182 points, 74 comments)
    7. My favorite ancap jokey-story :) (177 points, 68 comments)
    8. Sometimes the indoctrination isn't subtle. (176 points, 70 comments)
    9. This is fantastic--government tax collectors in Mogadishu complain no one wants to pay taxes, they "consider me to be a bandit." You are a bandit, sir. (171 points, 65 comments)
    10. Checkmate, intellectual-property fans ;P (164 points, 79 comments)
  11. 2557 points, 10 submissions: coupdetaco
    1. It's totally not rigged... anymore (754 points, 87 comments)
    2. She cannot recall (295 points, 23 comments)
    3. We've always been at war with Eastasia (267 points, 17 comments)
    4. Just wanted to give credit to leftists for breaking those glass ceilings (216 points, 8 comments)
    5. Cop tricks person into putting out a cigarette to use that as an excuse to arrest him and search his car (212 points, 140 comments)
    6. "If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there would be a shortage of sand" (181 points, 25 comments)
    7. We've always been at war with Eurasia (162 points, 11 comments)
    8. Mexican dentists near border crossing town get 95% customers from USA. They charge 75% less and their "materials and equipment are just as good or even better" (160 points, 38 comments)
    9. Just wanted to help everyone here understand Socialism (159 points, 11 comments)
    10. In fairness to her, that level of corruption is almost like a magic trick (151 points, 16 comments)
  12. 2398 points, 9 submissions: ancapistan_man
    1. Bread lines (542 points, 111 comments)
    2. All the hypocrisy. (341 points, 82 comments)
    3. All the above. (317 points, 63 comments)
    4. Battle of the statists. (253 points, 127 comments)
    5. We're gonna need a bigger boat. (224 points, 12 comments)
    6. [foaming at the mouth] Not real communism! (198 points, 14 comments)
    7. But without government.... (190 points, 29 comments)
    8. Literally shaking. (171 points, 61 comments)
    9. iT wAsN't ReAl CoMmUnIsM. (162 points, 13 comments)
  13. 2367 points, 10 submissions: Anen-o-me
    1. /A_C's opinion of Gary Johnson in one image (464 points, 123 comments)
    2. Time-Warner increases internet speeds six-fold at no extra charge after Google Fiber announces plans to expand into their territory --- so in other words, competition works (312 points, 43 comments)
    3. Vince Vaughn -- “We have the right to bear arms to resist the supreme power of a corrupt and abusive government” (227 points, 37 comments)
    4. After seeing this I have a strong urge to become a graffiti artist (215 points, 51 comments)
    5. Reddit's Former Leadership was planning to make Reddit a completely Decentralized App with bitcoin micropayments as upvotes for incentive, but after taking a $50m funding round, management was replaced and monetization focus began. Now ex employees are building what Reddit should've become. (215 points, 65 comments)
    6. SCOTUS Justice: If two can marry, why not four? -- How about you stop licensing marriage in the first place. (195 points, 111 comments)
    7. Satoshi Nakamoto nominated for Nobel Prize in Economics (190 points, 61 comments)
    8. politics realizes the presidency has too much power: "Don’t Just Impeach Trump. End the Imperial Presidency." (189 points, 60 comments)
    9. Meanwhile, at Molyneux's Freedomain Radio Headquarters... (183 points, 409 comments)
    10. Obama endorses Bitcoin... (177 points, 32 comments)
  14. 2220 points, 10 submissions: SnakesoverEagles
    1. Crying wolf: the left doesn't know how to stop losing (335 points, 182 comments)
    2. in light of recent events, here is Thomas Sowell (276 points, 264 comments)
    3. Ron Paul - Bernie Sanders destroyed Audit the Fed Bill at the last minute (236 points, 26 comments)
    4. Basic free market college group denied a local chapter because they are "white supreemists" (220 points, 227 comments)
    5. Get out your tinfoil hats boys (212 points, 95 comments)
    6. An old classic (206 points, 57 comments)
    7. Hillary email leaks prove that the same people who fund her campaign (Saudi Arabia) are funding ISIS - when will this house of cards fall? (205 points, 25 comments)
    8. Please clap (183 points, 55 comments)
    9. Ron Paul - Stump the socialist (176 points, 139 comments)
    10. Why Tim Kaine was picked as VP (171 points, 101 comments)
  15. 2219 points, 8 submissions: SuaveCrouton
    1. Late Stage Capitalism (405 points, 90 comments)
    2. Social Democracy (371 points, 51 comments)
    3. But it wasn't a real rocket (305 points, 30 comments)
    4. The Green Party dilemma (304 points, 71 comments)
    5. LateStageCapitalism_irl (236 points, 34 comments)
    6. When I look at gains from free trade (218 points, 21 comments)
    7. The world as 100 people over the last two centuries (213 points, 103 comments)
    8. Private Eye explains Corbynomics (167 points, 23 comments)
  16. 1932 points, 8 submissions: LibertyAboveALL
    1. Julian Assange offers job to fired Google employee who wrote "anti-diversity" memo - "Censorship is for losers." (426 points, 124 comments)
    2. Great idea on road sign from Mexican restaurant in Austin (278 points, 30 comments)
    3. Gmail will now warn you if you’re being targeted by the government (260 points, 26 comments)
    4. Calexit Means American Taxpayers Won't Have To Bailout California's Ticking Pension Time Bomb (251 points, 69 comments)
    5. Uber threatens exit Houston over regulations. Mayor says "I'm happy to sit down with you [Uber] but I'm not going to do business with you with a gun to my head." - you really can't make this shit up! (245 points, 79 comments)
    6. AAA, largest U.S. automobile club, calls for scrapping police marijuana THC test for drivers. AAA's safety foundation said it's not possible to set a blood-test threshold for THC that can reliably determine impairment. (160 points, 33 comments)
    7. TIL: SEC laws stop crowd-funding sites, like INDIEGOGO, from offering investor equity financing options for non-accredited investors (average person). In other words, the government only allows rich people to do it. (160 points, 66 comments)
    8. Dying mom kidney transplant surgery on hold due to GoFundMe donations since they could constitute ‘organ selling’, which is a U.S. federal crime. (152 points, 47 comments)
  17. 1854 points, 8 submissions: Mashimoto
    1. Venezuela bans lines outside of bakeries declaring them a clear political stunt to discredit socialism (289 points, 50 comments)
    2. Someone made a Chrome extension that changes "white" to "black" on Huffpo, Salon, and Buzzfeed (283 points, 69 comments)
    3. How Liberals really feel about black people (265 points, 106 comments)
    4. (old footage) Ron Paul makes standard libertarian arguments against the drug war that are now almost universally accepted to an absolutely hostile host/audience. Amazing how attitudes can change (263 points, 138 comments)
    5. It Looks Like George Soros is Funding the Trump Protests (256 points, 72 comments)
    6. Charles Rangel's Freudian Slip (181 points, 21 comments)
    7. "Only the rich will have X technology" India's $4 smartphone. (166 points, 44 comments)
    8. Bernie Sanders Resume from the 1980s (151 points, 118 comments)
  18. 1756 points, 7 submissions: MaunaLoona
    1. 4chan on communism (539 points, 122 comments)
    2. Canadian man fights off home invaders by taking their gun and shooting them; gets charged with attempted murder and nine other firearms related charges (312 points, 76 comments)
    3. But without the government who would fund PBS? Reading Rainbow raises $1 million on kickstarter in the first day. (202 points, 59 comments)
    4. Adam Kokesh on CBS (197 points, 213 comments)
    5. Apparently we have a new mascot (174 points, 30 comments)
    6. What $15/hr minimum wage looks like (169 points, 182 comments)
    7. To protect you from fake news the US government launches a fact checking web site (163 points, 53 comments)
  19. 1663 points, 5 submissions: Uncle_Washington
    1. LateStageCapitalism logic (456 points, 98 comments)
    2. Macarons va Macron (401 points, 39 comments)
    3. Like scientist we have to prove our theory (380 points, 83 comments)
    4. Feel the Bern out (245 points, 71 comments)
    5. The North Remembers (181 points, 14 comments)
  20. 1582 points, 2 submissions: pseudoRndNbr
    1. CNN: It's illegal for you to read the leaked emails. Only we are allowed to do it. (1353 points, 149 comments)
    2. But who will provide food to the poor? (229 points, 70 comments)
  21. 1581 points, 4 submissions: Ze-skywalker
    1. Rare picture of a child about to be born (530 points, 70 comments)
    2. "The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false front for the urge to rule it." H.L. Mencken (428 points, 13 comments)
    3. Woke (370 points, 44 comments)
    4. Capitalism X Socialism (253 points, 49 comments)
  22. 1576 points, 6 submissions: HEADPOCKET
    1. What a novel idea. (477 points, 87 comments)
    2. Mises before bitches. (325 points, 56 comments)
    3. Here is your average "pro-science" liberal. (266 points, 93 comments)
    4. If Sweden and Germany Became US States, They Would be Among the Poorest States (189 points, 97 comments)
    5. Can't explain that. (162 points, 51 comments)
    6. George Zimmer, the owner and founder of The Men's Wearhouse, does not background check his employees. "I don't trust the U.S. justice system to get it right," says Zimmer, who is himself a recovering alcoholic. "I'd rather make my own decisions." : todayilearned (157 points, 32 comments)
  23. 1568 points, 6 submissions: Jamesshrugged
    1. The consequences of racism (395 points, 135 comments)
    2. The lesson liberals are going to learn under the new administration. (343 points, 48 comments)
    3. Every single time (295 points, 22 comments)
    4. Give me Liberty or gtfo! (191 points, 61 comments)
    5. anarcho_capitalism's most used words (174 points, 71 comments)
    6. /philosophy mods have completely banned posts about Ayn Rand (on grounds that she is an author, not a philosopher) (170 points, 134 comments)
  24. 1478 points, 6 submissions: ayanamirs
    1. Could someone please explain this? (388 points, 84 comments)
    2. Slate (297 points, 43 comments)
    3. LMAO (232 points, 58 comments)
    4. Mises Cuba! (210 points, 45 comments)
    5. Ancap Studies (181 points, 55 comments)
    6. Wtf? Anarcho-capitalists (170 points, 144 comments)
  25. 1468 points, 1 submission: How_To_Liberty
    1. I used to be an Ancap, but my job made me turn to socialism. (1468 points, 118 comments)
  26. 1464 points, 6 submissions: spatchcock
    1. Happy thanksgiving /ancap (496 points, 86 comments)
    2. They aren't protesters or rioters. They're Keynesian stimulus operatives, and Krugman disapproves. (223 points, 22 comments)
    3. This kid will go places. Also, I guarantee there's a bureaucrat out there somewhere who is trying to stop him. (213 points, 53 comments)
    4. This is what good parenting looks like, but yet to leftists and some bureaucrats this is horrible because its un-taxed income, dangerously unregulated, exploitation, and child labor. (190 points, 65 comments)
    5. Wow TED talks really suck now - "Capitalism will eat democracy unless we speak up" - By Yanis Varoufakis (the greek finance minister. Yes Greece, the European country that adopted DemSoc ideals and is now riddled with debt) (180 points, 203 comments)
    6. If I were a big corporation I'd lobby for higher minimum wages and rally the useful idiots on the left to my cause as well. (162 points, 33 comments)
  27. 1414 points, 7 submissions: moople1
    1. And anarcho communism was born. (239 points, 772 comments)
    2. Work or die. (239 points, 227 comments)
    3. The relationship between Bernie's socialism and the market summed up perfectly. (238 points, 48 comments)
    4. Finally it's fixed! Now children won't starve to death. (199 points, 123 comments)
    5. "Yo mama's so statist" jokes… (180 points, 96 comments)
    6. Hating the Establishment Is Not the Same as Supporting Liberty (164 points, 41 comments)
    7. 2016 Nolan Chart (155 points, 128 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Faceh (5402 points, 264 comments)
  2. aletoledo (3908 points, 532 comments)
  3. Anen-o-me (3667 points, 569 comments)
  4. andkon (3362 points, 237 comments)
  5. Lethn (3201 points, 304 comments)
  6. halfback910 (3043 points, 500 comments)
  7. ChopperIndacar (2799 points, 402 comments)
  8. Mashimoto (2207 points, 181 comments)
  9. LOST_TALE (2150 points, 507 comments)
  10. Harnisfechten (2122 points, 299 comments)
  11. TheGreatRoh (2085 points, 237 comments)
  12. Anenome5 (1990 points, 293 comments)
  13. LibertyAboveALL (1974 points, 316 comments)
  14. Anarkhon (1925 points, 42 comments)
  15. natermer (1873 points, 239 comments)
  16. Not_Pictured (1835 points, 173 comments)
  17. bearjewpacabra (1813 points, 267 comments)
  18. maszyna (1769 points, 224 comments)
  19. chbrules (1745 points, 200 comments)
  20. jatucker (1688 points, 131 comments)
  21. LookingForMySelf (1637 points, 274 comments)
  22. bhknb (1590 points, 329 comments)
  23. Argosy37 (1568 points, 113 comments)
  24. stormsbrewing (1562 points, 107 comments)
  25. GuyFromV (1466 points, 313 comments)
  26. TheSelfGoverned (1416 points, 204 comments)
  27. deefop (1369 points, 153 comments)
  28. samsonkeane (1364 points, 129 comments)
  29. ProjectD13X (1351 points, 193 comments)
  30. Pinochet-Heli-Tours (1328 points, 112 comments)
  31. RonaldMcPaul (1306 points, 250 comments)
  32. Juz16 (1271 points, 151 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. TSA agents vs terrorists by an1h (3993 points, 173 comments)
  2. Ron Paul got an electoral vote from Texas. by FreeqAxel (2906 points, 128 comments)
  3. I used to be an Ancap, but my job made me turn to socialism. by How_To_Liberty (1468 points, 118 comments)
  4. CNN: It's illegal for you to read the leaked emails. Only we are allowed to do it. by pseudoRndNbr (1353 points, 149 comments)
  5. Louds and clear by -INFOWARS- (1119 points, 180 comments)
  6. Arguing about the state of Venezuela to a redditor by Phresh_Prince (809 points, 182 comments)
  7. How to trigger /Socialism by Z3F (772 points, 200 comments)
  8. It's totally not rigged... anymore by coupdetaco (754 points, 87 comments)
  9. Stefan Molyneux on Twitter | "Bernie promised cheap education. $27 average donation. Mission accomplished. $27 got you truly schooled on the reality of Dem politics." by TheGreatRoh (746 points, 158 comments)
  10. Makes you think... by -INFOWARS- (742 points, 161 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 1523 points: Anarkhon's comment in Looting intensifies in Venezuela - only 15 days worth of food remains
  2. 1070 points: cockholster_69's comment in Is having daughters the ultimate cuckoldry?
  3. 495 points: Faceh's comment in Ron Paul got an electoral vote from Texas.
  4. 456 points: deleted's comment in Is having daughters the ultimate cuckoldry?
  5. 423 points: FidelHimself's comment in I used to be an Ancap, but my job made me turn to socialism.
  6. 396 points: narutouz's comment in Is having daughters the ultimate cuckoldry?
  7. 336 points: skylercollins's comment in Is having daughters the ultimate cuckoldry?
  8. 329 points: backwardsmiley's comment in / physical_removal was just banned
  9. 283 points: misery_man's comment in Is having daughters the ultimate cuckoldry?
  10. 250 points: Avertus's comment in I used to be an Ancap, but my job made me turn to socialism.
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submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

EB85 – Adam Draper: Accelerating 100 Bitcoin Startups With Boost VC BIGGEST FRAUDS IN BITCOIN - Andreas M. Antonopoulos Bitcoin: Has BTC Finally Begun Its Decline? (January 2020) Ripple - XRP -Ripplecharts.com Bitcoin Halving 2020 Auswirkungen? - CCID Blockchain Ranking April: EOS, TRON, ETH vor BTC

Ich bin immer noch optimistisch, was Bitcoin betrifft, aber es ist einfach das Risikoniveau, das mich zum Verkauf bewegt. Ripple versucht Zahlungsinfrastruktur zu vereinheitlichen Der CTO von Ripple disktutierte außerdem mit seinem Vorgänger, dem heutigen Coil -CEO Stefan Thomas, über den aktuellen Zustand des Finanzsystems. Hong Kong-based bitcoin trading, futures and options platform Bitfinex announced to day the results of an independent audit by Ripple Labs CTO Stefan Thomas. According to the audit, Bitfinex was in full possession of all claimed funds, and has BTC reserves equaling 102.82% of all required holdings. The audit did not examine any part of … Charts; Bitcoin Minning Hardware; Bitcoin Minning Software-News; Contact; Blog Archives China’s Huobi exchange passes proof-of-solvency audit with 103% fund reserves Posted on 29th August, 2014 . The final member of China’s “big three” bitcoin exchanges has passed a proof-of-solvency audit with flying colors. In an independent audit published by Ripple Labs CTO Stefan Thomas, Huobi ... Californian FinTech firm Ripple Labs has been awarded a patent in the U.S. for an invention by Stefan Thomas (currently, CEO of Coil) and Evan Schwartz (co-inventor of the Interledger Protocol; currently a board member at Coil).. The application (No. 15/873,737) for this patent (No. 10,789,068), which has the title “System and method for verifying sequence of instructions of software”, was ... Bitcoin Charts. Blocks: 481823: Total BTC: 16.523M: Difficulty: 923233068449: Estimated: 887736944047 in 1 blks: Network total: 7983858.406 Thash/s: Blocks/hour: 7.25 / 497 s: Home; Bitcoin ; Markets; Charts; About. Sep 7, 2020 06:47:53 (UTC) Advertise on Bitcoincharts. Welcome! Bitcoincharts provides financial and technical data related to the Bitcoin network. Bitcoin News 25 Aug 2011 Video ...

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EB85 – Adam Draper: Accelerating 100 Bitcoin Startups With Boost VC

Reposted from Newfination. 2013 interview. Ripple - XRP - Bitcoin - Digital Currency. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Focusing exclusively on Bitcoin for an extended time, they've invested in companies such as Blockcypher, Coinprism, Coinjar, Mirror, Snapcard, Zapchain and many others. #bitcoin #blockchain #kryptowährung (*) Bei den mit Sternchen markierten Links handelt es sich um Affiliate-Links. Im Fall einer Bestellung/Anmeldung über einen solchen Link werde ich am Erlös ... THE BIG PICTURE Where Prices Are Going in 2020–2021 for Bitcoin Crypto & the Ripple XRP Price Chart - Duration: ... Ripple/XRP: Chris Larsen & Stefan Thomas Know XRP Will WIN - Duration: 10:44 ...

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